Summer’s Sweetest Superfoods

Anything in a popsicle shape is like contraband to my kids. Now that summer cranked up the heat, I’ve been stocking my freezer with popsicles made from left over smoothies. This is one of my sneakiest childhood nutrition tricks, and it takes zero additional prep time if you’re already in the habit of smoothie making.

  • Step 1) Make a smoothie
  • Step 2) Pour it into a popsicle mold

Don’t have popsicle molds? Grab some Dixie cups and wooden popsicle sticks and let them stand on a flat surface in the freezer to harden.

The best part of these treats is that they’re loaded with fiber, fat, and protein which is the holy trinity of fuel for little bodies. They get to choose which color they want, and even if they didn’t love the smoothie when first served at a breakfast, there’s no debating they will suddenly love it when it’s offered outside as a cool down treat.

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Since all my smoothie recipes contain at least one, if not more, vegetables, kids get a healthy dose of antioxidants and phytochemicals in a fun-to-eat snack. Below are the links to all my favorite smoothies along with their sneaky vegetables:

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Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2020


Carrot Zinger Smoothie

I rarely crave smoothies outside of breakfast time, but this is one exception. Some afternoons I need a flavorful pick-me-up, and this makes my cells sing. Because of this wild world we’re living in with a global pandemic and everyone on edge with their health, I developed a recipe that speaks directly to some immune supporting nutrients that may add protection against COVID.

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Food is medicine, and here is how it’s applied in the defense of COVID:

  • Turmeric- Turmeric contains curcumin, thought to be an herbal therapy against COVID. It is highly anti-inflammatory. When inflammation is down, the immune system is up. Its antimicrobial properties can target viral respiratory infections like bronchitis, influenza, and coughs….sound familiar, 2020? Turmeric also acts as a natural pain killer to help ease body aches from illness.
  • Ginger- This root is another anti-inflammatory spice that acts as an antimicrobial. Microbes can be either bacteria or viruses. COVID is a virus. Fresh ginger has been known as a remedy for RSV and bronchitis, both of which are also viruses (although bronchitis can also be bacterial). One study showed ginger may provide a therapeutic option alone for respiratory and airway conditions such as asthma.
  • Carrots– Carrots contain beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A. Your body burns through Vitamin A during times of illness (don’t believe me? test your night vision next time you’re sick!). Vitamin A is ONLY found in animal products. You may be thinking, “wait, I thought my canned pumpkin said 130% of vitamin A?” That label is assuming that under the perfect circumstances, with the perfect genetics, with the perfect nutritional mechanisms, you COULD convert the amount of Beta Carotene in that can of pumpkin into that much Vitamin A.  Most of our bodies aren’t walking around in a state of nutritional perfection though, so we aren’t getting what that label promises.  All the more reason to get daily sources of rich orange/yellow produce in the diet. Vitamin A is also a fat soluble vitamin, which is why I added:
  • Coconut Oil- This medium chain triglyceride is insta brain fuel and also helps bind to turmeric and vitamin A to help increase absorption and assimilation. Turmeric and vitamin A are both dependent on fat to help them get into the blood stream and work their magic. Coconut oil is another antimicrobial ingredient in this smoothie.
  • Oranges and lemon– Some countries are brilliantly using mega doses of intravenous vitamin C as a treatment for Coronavirus. While the modest amount of vitamin C in a few citrus fruits would be a small drop in the bucket compared to the massive dose of C that is actually proving to be treat the disease, the oranges and lemons in this smoothie will build a foundation for sustainable immune support.

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As with all smoothies, add the hardest/most dense ingredients at the top for the most efficient blending (frozen fruits, ice cubes, or in this case, raw carrots). Liquids always go at the bottom.

Any left overs can be made into popsicles as a standby for if you end up coming down with a fever or sore throat and don’t have much of an appetite. Or, you could always enjoy your popsicle in perfectly good health and dream of sunshine on a island, because we could all use a tropical escape right about now too!

Carrot Zinger Smoothie

  • Servings: Four, 8oz servings
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

Carrot Zinger Smoothie

  • 1 1/2 cups non-dairy liquid of choice (coconut milk, coconut water, almond milk, etc)
  • 2 large oranges, peeled, or 4 small clementines/Cuties
  • 1 lemon, peeled
  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 2-3 Tbsp seeds of choice (hemp hearts, chia seeds, or flaxseeds)
  • 1 teaspoon ginger (or less if you want a little less zing to your zinger)
  • 1 teaspoons turmeric (or less if you’re building up an acquired taste!)
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 1-2″ pieces

Optional: add a scoop of collagen powder, bone broth protein powder, protein powder of your choice. I don’t use protein powders with my kids, so we’ve settled on protein coming from the hemp seeds in the recipe above.

Directions

Add all ingredients in the order given and blend in high-speed blender. Remember all frozen or firm ingredients should always go last into your blender for the best blending.

Refrigerate left overs in sealed glass jars for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 3-6 months in popsicle molds or glass mason jars.

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2020


Molasses Spice Cookies

Iron-rich molasses, heaps of anti-inflammatory spices, and protein from almond butter make this cookie a reasonable, yet sweet, holiday treat. Growing up, my mom’s famous molasses cookies were an unspoken part of every Christmas. This recipe was an easy one to re-invent, using my Sneaky Snickerdoodles as a starting point, simply swapping out the maple syrup for molasses and tossing in a few more spices. The result is crispy on the outside, gooey on the inside, and now a new part of my Christmas!

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Although molasses isn’t considered a refined sugar or among the “white devils” it still contributes a fair amount of sugar in these cookies. They are sweet enough without frosting, but if you are serving these to anyone with a hole in their sweet tooth, this egg nog buttercream frosting is a delicious addition. These no longer keep the cookie dairy-free or refined sugar-free, but it does make it look festive!

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Egg Nog Buttercream Frosting (Optional)

  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 2 cups powered sugar
  • 2 teaspoons egg nog
  • Dash nutmeg

Mix all together in a mixer until sugar is dissolved and frosting looks glossy. Spread a thin even layer on top of cookies and sprinkle a dusting of nutmeg to decorate.

Molasses Spice Cookies

  • Servings: 18 cookies
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

Molasses Spice Cookie Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups almond flour or almond meal
  • 3/4 cup molasses
  • 1/2 cup almond butter*
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon cloves
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon all-spice
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt

*Runny almond butter is best! A jar is usually the runniest when newly opened. If you’re scraping the bottom of the barrel on your almond butter, add an additional 1-2 teaspoons of coconut oil to the recipe.

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. In a large mixing bowl or stand mixer bowl, add all ingredients in the order given. Mix just until all ingredients are incorporated.

Scoop 1 inch round balls of dough onto prepared cookie sheet. You may choose to roll them in your hands or use a cookie dough scoop for more consistency. Using the bottom of a glass jar or cup, flatten the balls into round cookies, about 1/4″ thick.

Bake for approximately 10 minutes. If you like a gooier cookie, pull them out sooner, around 8 minutes. Transfer to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store them in a tightly sealed container for up to a week in the refrigerator or 3-6 months in the freezer.

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2019


Orange Dreamsicle Smoothie

If I told you the truth that this smoothie was inspired by my daughter’s leftover frozen babyfood, promise me you won’t hit Back on your browser?  I had loads of left over frozen butternut squash puree that I threw into a smoothie one day. The result was creamy, flavorful, and glycemic-balanced with a flavor reminiscent of the Schwann’s man push pops from the 90s (are those still a thing?). To me, it’s not a smoothie if it doesn’t have a veggie. I’ve used both the butternut squash cubes from the natural foods freezer and the spirals found in the main freezer section. The mild taste of butternut squash blends right in to the creamy orange flavor, but I encourage you to experiment with your favorite brightly colored fruits and veggies:

Yellow/orange vegetables: butternut squash, acorn squash, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, carrots

Yellow/orange fruits: peaches, bananas, mangos, papaya, cantaloupe, oranges, clementines, pineapple, lemon

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Orange Dreamsicle Smoothie

Orange produce is usually loaded with Beta Carotene, a pre-courser to Vitamin A. Your body burns through Vitamin A during times of illness (don’t believe me? test your night vision next time you’re sick!). Vitamin A is ONLY found in animal products. You may be thinking, “wait, I thought my canned pumpkin said 130% of vitamin A?” That label is assuming that under the perfect circumstances, with the perfect genetics, with the perfect nutritional mechanisms, you COULD convert the amount of Beta Carotene in that can of pumpkin into that much Vitamin A.  Most of our bodies aren’t walking around in a state of nutritional perfection though, so we aren’t getting what that label promises.  All the more reason to get daily sources of rich orange/yellow produce in the diet.

Orange Dreamsicle Smoothie

  • Servings: Four, 8oz servings
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

Orange Dreamsicle Smoothie

  • 1  cup non-dairy milk of choice (almond, coconut, or oat milk)
  • 1/2 cup orange juice (or 2 Tbsp of frozen OJ concentrate)
  • 2 large oranges, peeled, or 4 small clementines/Cuties
  • 2 ripe bananas
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 3 Tbsp seeds of choice (hemp hearts, chia seeds, or flaxseeds)
  • 1 cup cooked or frozen butternut squash
  • 1 cup frozen mangoes
  • Small handful of red raspberries (see note)**

Optional: add a scoop of collagen powder or this Vega Tropical Tango Smoothie powder for bonus protein. I don’t use protein powders with my kids, so we’ve settled on protein coming from the hemp seeds in the recipe above.

**Adding just a few raspberries enhances the color, taking it from a dull yellow to a bright orange. It’s an optional step, but an aesthetic one that helps picky eaters who eat with their eyes first. About 5-7 red raspberries is enough to do the trick!

Directions

Add all ingredients in the order given and blend! Remember all frozen food should always go last into your blender for the best blending.

Refrigerate left overs in sealed glass jars for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 3-6 months.

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2019


Salmon Chowder

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The first chill in the air means chowder on the stove. The is a perfect dinner for cold nights, and it makes a lot so we’re always able to invite an extra guest to our table. It’s creamy, flavorful, and hearty. Canned salmon can be replaced with fresh filet, however it’s so easy to find wild-caught Alaskan salmon on the shelves that it’s hard to pass up the convenience and cost of canned.

Salmon Chowder

  • Servings: 12 Servings
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

Salmon Chowder

  • 3 Tablespoons ghee (sub butter unless dairy free)
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cups diced potatoes
  • 3 carrots, diced
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried dill weed
  • 2 (16 ounce) cans salmon, drained
  • 1 (15 ounce) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 (15 ounce) can creamed corn
  • Shredded cheddar cheese (optional, otherwise the chowder is dairy free)

Directions

Melt butter in a large pot or dutch oven over medium-high heat. Saute onion, celery, and garlic until translucent and tender. Stir in broth, potatoes, carrots, salt, pepper, and dill. Bring to a boil and reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

Once potatoes and carrots are soft, stir in both cans of drained salmon, breaking apart large pieces. Add in coconut milk and creamed corn. Top with cheese if desired.

Serve with green salad and corn bread for a delicious filling winter dinner!

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2019


Eating for Iron-Clad Immunity

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While washing your hands is the single most effective thing you can do to keep from getting sick, the powers we behold on the end of the fork can also make a huge impact on immunity. The foods that fuel our body can be the difference between an iron-clad immune system or a winter trapped in bed. Defend yourself against colds and flu this year with these immune-boosting medicinal foods:

  • Garlic– Small but mighty, garlic is nature’s best display of “food as medicine.” Its potent medicinal properties will battle anything from colds, flu, viruses, or infections. Two raw garlic cloves have the same antibacterial strength as one dose of antibiotics, but without the gut-harming effects antibiotics can leave. Garlic contains strong antioxidants that have been found to affect immune responses in the blood and have broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties.
    • Garlic Rx: Chew one raw chopped garlic and a spoonful of honey at the first sign of a tickle. The key is that the garlic must be chopped first, then let it sit for 10 minutes. Letting it sit will activate the germ-fighting compounds that make it the safest and most effective magic pill against illness. When paired with honey, not only does it make it more palatable, but honey alone acts as an antimicrobial (antiviral and antibacterial), and antioxidant. These two powerhouses to work synergistically and fight whatever stands in its way. It may taste potent, but it’s effective!
  • Elderberries- Research shows elderberries prevent viruses from attacking healthy cells in the lining of the nose and throat. When taken before an infection, it can stop the virus in its tracks. When taken after an infection, it can reduce the duration of the illness in half (think 3 days rather than 6).  Elderberries are packed with antioxidants, especially immune-boosting vitamin C and taste great too!
    • Elderberry Rx: Elderberry syrup, or Sambucus, can be purchased in most grocery or health food stores however making your own from dried black elderberries can save money.  Follow the label on the product, usually increasing the amount and frequency of the syrup until an illness has passed.
  • Turmeric- Curcumin, the bright yellow component that gives turmeric its signature color, is highly anti-inflammatory. When inflammation is down, the immune system is up. Its antimicrobial properties can target respiratory infections like bronchitis, influenza, and coughs. Turmeric also acts as a natural pain killer to help ease body aches from illness.
    • Turmeric Rx: Warm up to a mug of turmeric tea, also called golden milk, for a simple and effective cure-all. Simmer 1-2 cups of water or almond milk, adding in 1 teaspoon each of turmeric, cinnamon, and ginger. Add honey to sweeten and enjoy warm!
  • Bone broth- As one of the most nutrient-dense sources of vitamins, minerals, and electrolytes, bone broth is an ideal cold and flu remedy.  Bones and tissues of chicken, cow, or pork, are simmered and broken down leaving behind a great source of amino acids and gut-healing collagen to speed recovery.
    • Bone broth Rx: Pre-made broth can be purchased in most grocery stores but it’s also easy to make your own at home. Use 3-4 pounds of organic bones in just enough water to cover bones. Add vegetables like onions, garlic, celery, and carrots plus a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to help break down the bones. Simmer for 12-24 hours or until bones are soft and can easily be broken. Strain through a fine mesh strainer. Enjoy a warm cup of the rich broth that remains, use it as a base for soup, or opt for the broth as the liquid used to cook grains like rice or quinoa.
  • Sauerkraut- Gut health plays a large part in immunity, and fermented foods provide probiotics to strengthen the digestive tract. Probiotics, or healthy bacteria, have been shown to lower your chances of getting a cold and reduce the severity of an illness if you do get sick. Sauerkraut is a superfood loaded with healthy probiotics and vitamin C, a one-two punch for warding off illness.
    • Sauerkraut Rx: Skip the pasteurized store-bought sauerkraut found in the center aisles. Most of the beneficial bugs have been lost during the high-heat pasteurization process and likely contain preservatives and sugar. Instead, buy sauerkraut from the refrigerated section or make your own using only two ingredients. Shred one head of purple cabbage as thinly as your knife allows and sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of sea salt. Knead for 10 minutes to draw out juices and pack in glass jars, ensuring enough juice covers cabbage. Seal tightly and let sit covered in a warm dark place for 2-4 weeks to ferment.  

Stock your pantry with these powerhouses and layer these foods within a low-sugar diet. Vitamin C and sugar compete for uptake, so the more sugar we eat, the less vitamin C we can absorb. Choose a variety of brightly colored fruits and vegetables daily to offer the best nutrients needed to ward off sickness. Let food be thy medicine as you eat for strong immunity this winter.

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2020


Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Blender Muffins

My first job out of college involved going on a local TV segment to talk about nutrition and fitness. I paired up with my coworker who was a dietitian, and every month, we would do back to back segments on health. It was on the set of this local talk show my coworker first introduced me to chocolate chip pumpkin muffins. I thought they were brilliant. That was also 15 years ago before the buzz of gluten free, dairy free, and healthy fat hit mainstream. I’ve reinvented that recipe with a modern take on healthy ingredients, and I continue to think they are brilliant. I hope you do too!

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Using a high speed blender for these muffins results in a perfectly moist, rich, and flavorful muffin every time, plus a relatively easy clean up! Muffins can be a junk food or a health food, and I like to place these in the later category. Pumpkin supplies a healthy dose of beta carotene from the rich orange color, which converts to vitamin A, a must for good night vision. The almond butter is the best choice for nut free butters in these and gives a healthy dose of protein and fat. These are gluten free, oil free, and dairy free (as long as you use dairy free chocolate chips!).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIf you are sensitive to gluten or have celiac, make sure you use certified gluten free oats. Oats are naturally gluten free, but since most of them are processed in factories that process other gluten containing grains, it often contaminates it.

 

Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Muffins

  • Servings: 12 Muffins
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Blender Muffins

  • 1 1/4 cup Libby’s pumpkin puree
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup dairy free milk of choice (I prefer coconut or oat milk)
  • 1/3 cup almond butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 1/4 cups old fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 cup mini chocolate chips, divided

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 F and spray muffin tins with non-stick cooking spray. In a high speed blender, mix all ingredients in the order given. Blend until well incorporated. Add 1/2 cup of chocolate chips into the batter and pulse just long enough to incorporate.

Scoop batter into prepared muffin tins 3/4 full. Sprinkle tops with remaining chocolate chips and put muffin tray into oven. Bake for 20 minutes or until a toothpick is inserted and comes out clean. Let cool for 3-5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack. Store tightly sealed in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

*Note: Fresh almond butter tends to be runnier and works better in this recipe. I don’t suggest substituting with other nut butters, especially peanut butter. If you are using the bottom of the jar of almond butter which can be dry or flaky, add a teaspoon of coconut oil to the recipe for an even consistency.

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2019


Double Chocolate Blender Muffins

My high speed blender has become a permanent fixture in my kitchen. Between my daily smoothie, soups, baby food, pancake batter, and now THESE BLENDER MUFFINS, it’s not going anywhere anytime soon.

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Cocoa is among the world’s top superfoods and when I have the chance to disguise antioxidant dense foods in the form of sweets, I tell myself it’s all in the name of good nutrition. Cocoa is high in magnesium, iron, fiber, and is one of the richest sources of pholyphenols, the antioxidants that give cocoa the anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular health benefits.

These muffins are gluten free, and if you are sensitive to gluten or have celiac, make sure you use certified gluten free oats. Oats are naturally gluten free, but since most of them are processed in factories that process other gluten containing grains, it often contaminates it.

Double Chocolate Muffins

  • Servings: 12 Muffins
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

Double Chocolate Blender Muffins

  • 2 medium ripe bananas* (see note!)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup full-fat Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 cups old fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup non-alkalized unsweetened cocoa powder (I like Navitas Organic Cacao powder)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 cup mini chocolate chips, divided

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 F and spray muffin tins with non-stick cooking spray. In a high speed blender, mix all ingredients in the order given. Blend until well incorporated. Add 1/4 cup of chocolate chips into the batter and pulse long enough to incorporate.

Scoop batter into prepared muffin tins 3/4 full. Sprinkle tops with remaining chocolate chips and put muffin tray into oven. Bake for 15 minutes until a toothpick is inserted and comes out clean. Let cool for 3-5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack. Store refrigerated for up to 5 days.

*Note: Much of the sweetness comes from the ripe bananas. If you are too impatient to let your bananas ripen and wish to use bananas on the green side, increase the amount of maple syrup or honey you add by 1/4 cup. I have used frozen bananas, simply blending longer, and they turned out just as good.

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2019


Rustic Mulberry Muffins

I grew up with mulberry trees in our yard, and it was always a race to pick the juicy berries before the deer ate them. I now make excuses to play at our closest park and ironically come home with a Tupperware full of mulberries. Few people know about it, and many stop to ask what we are picking. I refer to them as the acai berry of the mid-west because of their mighty antioxidant power and super food status.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAlthough this recipe is truly a great one, getting your hands on mulberries can be a challenge, so simply replace the 2 cups of mulberries in this recipes with your favorite berry or fruit. Fresh mulberries are a rare find in a grocery store, but dried ones are more common. I haven’t made this recipe using dried mulberries, so I can’t speak to the outcome.

Mulberries aren’t as sweet as many other berries, but have an earthier, milder sweetness similar to a fig. They’re rich in anthocyanins, the phytochemical that gives them the deep purple color. The maple syrup in these muffins contribute just enough sweetness to compliment the tartness in the berries, and I find these to be a perfect “sweet enough” treat.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

These muffins are gluten free, and use chickpea flour which is one of my favorite GF flours to use. It’s one of the most inexpensive GF flours on the market, and it’s also not as gritty as others.

Rustic Mulberry Muffins

  • Servings: 12 Muffins
  • Difficulty: Moderate
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Ingredients

Rustic Mulberry Muffins

  • 3/4 cup brown rice flour
  • 1 cup of chickpea flour
  • 1 tablespoon flaxseed
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 3/4 cup maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 cups fresh mulberries, stems removed

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 F and spray muffin tins with non-stick cooking spray. In a medium bowl, mix together brown rice flour, chickpea flour, flaxseed, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and sea salt.

In a stand mixer bowl or blender, combine maple syrup, apple sauce, water, coconut oil, vinegar, and vanilla. Mix at low speed until incorporated. Pour dry ingredients into wet ingredients and combine until well mixed. Add mulberries last and fold in. Scoop batter into prepared muffin tins 3/4 full and put muffin tray into oven. Bake for 20-25 minutes until a toothpick is inserted and comes out clean. Let cool for 3-5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack.

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2019


Key Lime Avocado Mousse

This is one of the most deliciously sweet ways I could possibly think to eat avocado. My family went on a key lime pie hummus kick for a while, but the chickpeas just weren’t doing it for me anymore. I have a delicious chocolate avocado mousse recipe but I explored the realm of the true green avocado color and created a mouth-watering and guilt-free treat. The healthy fats and natural sweetness from avocado and coconut butter crowd out unnecessary sugar. Top with shredded coconut flakes, graham cracker crumbs, coconut chips, lime zest, or white chocolate. You can’t go wrong!

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Load up a ramekin or small mason jar for a perfect portion and chill these before serving. The acidity from the lime juice will keep the avocado from turning brown so they are a perfect make-ahead dessert for company.

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Key Lime Avocado Mousse

  • Servings: Four, 4oz servings
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

Key Lime Avocado Mousse

  • 2 large or 3 small avocados
  • Zest, juice, and pulp of 1 whole lime (approx 2 Tbsp lime juice, 1-2 tsp grated zest)
  • 2 Tbsp coconut butter
  • 2 Tbsp coconut milk
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • Coconut flakes for topping (optional)

Directions

Zest the rind of 1 lime, saving aside approximately 2 teaspoons of grated lime zest. In a food processor, add the flesh from the avocado, pulp and juice from what remains of the lime, coconut butter, coconut milk, maple syrup, and vanilla. Blend until a smooth and whipped consistency is achieved.

Pour mousse into single-serving dishes and top with grated lime zest and coconut flakes. Chill approximately 3 hours before serving, as this will give the mousse a firmer texture. Keep refrigerated for up to 4 days.

Photos and Content Copyright © Jaclyn Beaty Nutrition, 2019